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george w. bush and his attendant countries involvement with the superpac, and american crossroads. [applause] be mac thank you. there's a little less than two months before the election and in many ways this is the time the book was designed for because this are into these last two months, this is the election really get going. and to me, one of the great untold stories is not just obama versus romney. it is obama versus karl rove and he's in behind the scenes the whole time and he has put together over $1 billion that will be spent in these last two months. read new york here are not going to see much spent in the battleground states. and he's become king of the sub two. he has cover when you put this together money with money romney has raised the republican national committee is a total of about $1.8 billion. to put that in this, in no way, mccain had 375 million to spend, so this is a fact or a five. you'll start seeing it come out now. the other thing i want to discuss about him, is susie really? what does he do? is a political operative. how does he operate? what does he do?
, justice sotomayor and justice kagan and george w. bush's white house counsel, those three don't have any children. they have devoted themselves time to their careers. that's wonderful for those who want to do it. secretary chao doesn't have children. doctor jerry condoleezza rice doesn't have children. women who want to have a more sensible lifestyle choice, those who want to develop less time to their work and to their family, that is a goal, too. it should not be to make 100% of what men make. it should be to have a satisfying career. there is such a great variety of jobs available. flexible jobs, full-time jobs, they can work 60 or 80 hours a week and make an investment on wall street. women have all these choices. the ones who choose more sensible jobs with lower incomes should not be put down. they should not be made to feel as if they are making a valid choice. >> host: we are speaking with diana furchtgott-roth, author of "how obama's gender policies undermine america" and "women's figures: an illustrated guide to the economic progress of women in america." you have another book c
with george h. w. bush and his wife, barbara in part because they were all close contemporaries. philip and the 41st president had also both seen action in the pacific in world war ii, which give them a common bond. the queen is rather formal, bush told me, but i never found per reserved, standoffish. it is hard to explain really, but she is a very, very easy to be with. conversation comes easily. that ease was evident after the white house welcoming ceremony for her third state visit in 1991 when presidential aides for got to provide a set for the podium that have been designed for the considerably taller president's. while making her remarks, the cluster of microphones obscured the queen's face, offering tv viewers what appears to be a talking purple and white striped had. the queen laughed after words. another moment slightly gone wrong. her humor made it all seemed fine, george bush said. he also marveled at her stamina at age 65. at the state dinner he observed that her fast pace had left even the secret service panting. one of the queen's secret service once said she has too great
examiner" in circuit as chief of staff on george w. bush's council of economic advisers and served as chief economist at the labor department from 2003 to 2005. are you supportive of title ix in the world of sports? we just celebrated the anniversary, the 40th anniversary. >> when the courts were discussing title ix one of the methods that colleges could comply with title ix was having as many, fulfilling the desires of the different group. in other words if they were a request of women playing sports then that was fine but the way that they are interpreting it is that it has to be proportional. i'm not supportive of title ix with regards to proportionality. it has become a quota system. the fact is that there are more young men that want to play college sports than young women. there've been articles in "the new york times" about how colleges are playing games with the numbers so a woman can be on two teams for example in accounts is to people or young woman can sign up to play hockey when she enters as a freshman and then she decides she is tired of it so she can drop out and still be off
book. i want to thank today's panelists the senior partner who was president at george w. bush special envoy. and the projection of north korea ref refugee and joseph kim who is a remarkable individual who escaped from north korea at the age of 13. hudson institute was founded 51 years ago as a farred-looking international policy research organization designed to think creatively about how to achieve a better future in the face of unprecedented challenges of the early 1960s. the world has changed in significant ways since those days the fundamental day of looking at it has not. since the days of the founding hudson institute -- few determined individuals can make a significant difference in the fight for freedom and human rights. and the book that we will be discussing today escaped from north korea the untold story of the untold story of asia's under ground railroad em boys the concept. the senior fellow melanie kirkpatrick has been published by counter book and already received very favorable reviews on the wall street journal, the weekly standard, publishers weekly, the asia times a
of a former press secretary of president george w. bush? did you ever interview that offer? the father of scott mcclellan? >> i didn't interview him. all i can say about lyndon johnson's role in the assassination is in all my years of working on lyndon johnson's papers and going through his diaries and everything and all the people close to him i never found the slightest hint that he had everything to do with the assassination. >> mr. caro, lbj is well remembered as someone who was very adept at navigating the senate and working with congress as president to get some difficult things done. how well do you think he would do as president today getting things done with the very polarized environment? [applause] >> terrific question. it is hard to answer. part of the answer is the following. lyndon johnson became majority leader of the senate in 1955, the senate was and had been for decades -- let's put it that way -- taught to believe the same dysfunctional mess that it is today. bills couldn't get past because the power that confronted a president wasn't a party to this. wasn't republic
office. she saw the busts and president george w. bush's office of dwight eisenhower and he kept the busts there throughout his eight year presidency as a texan and as somebody who recognized as his father did and the southerners did and as republicans did that the eisenhower presidency and 52 begins a dialogue that we have had ever since in which the position will wax and wane and there will be stronger arguments and weaker arguments at any given time that we have a robust are and we also have an effective public sector. and the republicans basically are advocates for the private sector and that is the connection. >> what is something we would know about president eisenhower as a farmer after he retired from public service or his public life? >> what would he know about him? something that we talk about in "going home to glory." i learned an early lesson i think in leadership that i articulated before he went i went to college and that is he was a leader and i saw the way people responded to him and understood that to be the case. i knew he was special but above all he was a lea
george w. bush. and the headline of that top secret briefing was, and we ran it in "the washington post" after it became a big issue, was bin laden determined to strike in u.s. now, think about that. you're the president of the united states, you get a top secret report saying bin laden determined to strike in the u.s. you should do something. well, we know not enough was done can. we know that the government across the board failed to do what was necessary on potential terrorism, and we had 9/11. i tell you the theme song, the big music in this book i've written that i've tried to present is u.s. economy about to falter. and it's a warning. and it's disappointing, to be honest with you, it's agonizing that it can't get into the dialogue because we have a presidential election six weeks ago -- six weeks from now in which whoever, whether's obama, romney, they're going to have to sit there, and this is what they're going to be spending your time on. yes, young man. >> hi. um, i just -- oh, 13. >> thank you. >> i just wanted to say, first of all, that i am right in the middle of the price
, george w. bush, president bush made that connection explicitly. connected himself made the parallel with lincoln and the need to suppress the liberties in order to protect the nation. >> where did judge holt fall on that. >> he would have said there are places are civil liberties need to be suppressed. in doing so, it tends to be easier for people to look at holt and say what a wicked man he was and forget they were lincoln's own policies. he was pursuing lincoln's policy. lincoln named him judge advocate general on november 3rd and extend the has been use corp. us. that same month. it was only two to three weeks after lincoln appointed holt he suspended the writ of has been use corpus and issued emancipation proclamation. he wouldn't have put holt in that position if he didn't expect him to follow through on the policy and support him. holt was doing lincoln's work. >> wasn't it issued during that time as it is now. >> absolutely. there was a big issue. >> the issue of suppression of civil liby. yes there were many comaint lincoln had a famous dispiewt with the chief justice of the
it was. but not anymore. when george w. bush was president and the president was issuing presidential signing statements, which i thought he was saying he did not have to obey the law, but what happened was, there was a legitimate, strong argument being made by the president's supporters in favor of why the president had the use statements to distance himself from legislation. there were also very strong arguments by people like me who says that that is unconstitutional. the american bar association appointed a task force to look into these findings and i was a member of that task force, and then the president of the aba and i testified before a house committee and, guess what? even though a good face was being made for the president to issue and sign the statements, not one single democrat, not one saw any merit in his argument. even though i thought and a lot of other people thought that what the president was doing was clearly unconstitutional, the president saying i don't have to obey the law that i just time, not one republican done anything wrong with it. on issue after issue, f
, george w. bush had signed a law. two years earlier, -- i'm sorry, four years earlier, the supreme court had affirmed the constitutionality of it. but in a story that i tell at greater length, the conservative majority converted a relatively minor dispute over an obscure film put out by a nonprofit corporation into a complete rewriting of our campaign finance laws, based on the dual metaphors that corporations rule people and money isn't speech. those two ideas are at the heart of citizens united, and they are the story. that decision is very much the story of the 2012 presidential and perhaps even more importantly, lower ballot races. that brings us to the health care case. now, there were some so-called experts and pundits who watch the oral argument of that case and said, in my defense, i would just like to say, whatever, okay? [laughter] it was basic cable, all right? [laughter] you don't pay extra for cnn. >> no, it was somewhat more informed of a position on that. it looked to me during most of the arguments that the five conservatives were very much leaning against the obama admin
judicial restraint. but citizens united was a case where just a few years earlier, george w. bush had signed the mccain-feingold law or in just two years earlier, or more than two as i think, for years earlier the supreme court has affirmed the constitutionality of the mccain-feingold law. but in a story i tell at greater length in trenton, the conservative majority converted a relatively minor dispute over an obscure film put out by a nonprofit corporation into a complete rewriting of our campaign finance laws, based on the dual metaphors that corporations are people, and money is speech. and those two ideas are at the heart of citizens united, and they are the story -- and that decision is very much the story of the 2012 presidential and perhaps even more importantly, lower about race -- lower ballot raise. that brings us to the health care case you're now, there were some so-called experts and pundits who watched the oral argument of that case and said well, it's quite clear that the law is going to be overturned because of the questions. and in my defense -- [laughter] i would jus
of the book that that was a huge, huge area, even during that time. >> oh, absolutely, and, in fact, george w. bush, president bush, made that connection explicitly, connected himself, made the parallel with lincoln and the need to suppress civil liberties in order to protect the nation. >> where did judge holt fall on that? >> places where civil liberties need to be suppressed, but in doing so, it tends to be easier for people to look at holt and say what a wicked man he was, and forget that these were lincoln's own policies, and he was pursuing lincoln's policies. lincoln named him judge advocate general april 3rd, 1862 and extended the writ of habeas corpus that same month, and so it was just two to three weeks after lincoln appointed holt that he extended the writ of habeas corpus and the preliminary emancipation proke clay mages. he wouldn't have put him in that position if he didn't expect him to follow through on the policies and support them. holt was doing lincoln's work. >> was it an hsh -- an issue in that time like now? >> oh, yes. it was a big issue. the sus presentation of civil
, huge area even during that time. >> absolutely. and in fact, george w. bush, president bush made that connection explicitly connected himself and made the parallel with lincoln and the need to suppress civil liberties in order to protect the nation. >> where did judge colts solve that one? >> you would certainly have said, there are places where civil liberties need to be suppressed. but in doing so it tends to be easier for people to look at hold and say what a wicked and oppressive man he was an forget that these were lincoln's own policies and he was pursuing against policies. lincoln named tim judge advocate general on september 30th 1862. a suspended the writ of habeas corpus. that same month. so it was only 2-3 weeks after lincoln appointed holds that he suspended the writ of habeas corpus and also issued the emancipation proclamation, the preliminary emancipation proclamation. he would not have put him in that position if he did not expected to follow through on those policies and to support the. he was doing lincoln's work, but it is easier to get mad at him because he di
was on the shortlist for consideration for george h.w. bush and she told me that when she found that out and that there is polling being done, where she was like a top choice of a lot of people nationally, but she has to have her name removed and she did because she had really disagreed with the president, with reagan several times and she knew bush would follow similar policy. she really felt like a president needed someone who he could agree with and that they would have enough differences of opinion that it would not be comfortable for him or for her. so she was through for that reason. >> okay. very good. before that want to highlight, senator dianne feinstein. >> kathleen hall jamieson is the former dean of the school of communication at the university of pennsylvania. she is a prolific scholar and several years ago she wrote i think a very good book, which outlines a number of finds that women in iran and then run for public office. and dianne feinstein was i think amazingly able to overcome most of these double bonds. for example, although early in her career, in san francisco, as
in the 1990 amendments to the act and this is a letter from george h. w. bush thanking him for his collaboration and succeeding in getting that legislation passed. the 1990 amendment was important for us today. we paid $4 a gallon for gas in the sense that it was the amendment that discussed the composition of gas and the introduction of chemicals during certain seasons of the year in order to make for cleaner air. in a sample of his writing style. there are researchers to come because they're interested in particular topics but there's also people that come because the interested in particular techniques or approaches. some people are interested in the newspapers because of the negotiation for instance. and so this is a research question that bridges a variety of the records that we have and others are interested in his rhetoric. how much of it was involved in writing the speech but here is evidence of how intimately he was involved in the writing process draft after draft and he was striking things out to prepare his remarks in the senate floor proposing this in the 1990 legislat
leader mitchell was involved in 1990 in the clean air act in this was a letter from george h. w. bush thanking him for his collaboration and succeeding in getting that legislation passed. the 1990 amendment was important for us today. we pay $4 a gallon for gas. it was the amendment that discussed the composition of gas and the introduction of chemicals during certain seasons of the year in order to make cleaner air. and then a sample of mitchell's writing style. there are their researchers to come because they are interested in particular topics but there are also people who come because they are interested in particular techniques or purchase. some people are interested in mitchell's papers because of his negotiating skills for instance and so this is a research question that bridges a variety of the series of records that we have. others are interested in his rhetoric, how much he was really involved in writing the speeches. obviously all politicians have speechwriters which is evident of how intimately he was involved in the writing process as draft after draft goes through and he
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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